News of the Duels

Abstract

The period between 1660 and 1670 was an eventful one for both Britain and its martial arts. 1660 saw the Restoration, where the Stuart dynasty was returned to power under Charles II and the post-Civil War Commonwealth swept away. For all the optimism at Charles’ coronation, however, his kingdom was ill at ease. Such uneasy times were also significant for the press. It is what the press (and other sources from this period) reveal about duelling practice at the time, martial arts in general, and the changing nature of violence that is the focus of this article. As the insurrections, riots and various acts of violence taking place both in Britain and abroad demonstrate, the 1660s were certainly a violent time. But, as the newspaper coverage also demonstrates, the nature of violence itself was changing. This continued a trend, dating back to the Civil War, where close quarter fighting skills had begun to give way to the relative ease and convenience of firearms. British violence found itself, ironically, in as much a state of flux as the rest of the country.

View/Download

10.18573/j.2017.10097

Citation

Hay, Alexander. 2017. ‘News of the Duels: Restoration Duelling Culture and the Early Modern Press’, Martial Arts Studies 3, 90-102.

Contributor

Dr Alexander Hay is Lecturer of Digital Journalism at Southampton Solent University, and comes from an eclectic humanities background, covering everything from sea monsters to music journalism and reader response theory. His martial arts experience is similarly varied, and he is presently studying boxing, while retaining an on-going interest in Historical European Martial Arts (HEMA). His research interests include the history of journalism and online media and how they intersect with a wide range of other topics and disciplines.

Gong and Fa in Chinese Martial Arts

Abstract

The distinction between gong (skill) and fa (technique) is ubiquitous in Chinese martial arts. Utilizing Maurice Merleau- Ponty’s notion of ‘embodied intentionality’, I examine this distinction. I draw specific examples of the kinds of skills under discussion from a particular style of taijiquan – Hong Chuan Chen Shi taijiquan (Master Hong Junsheng’s transmission of Chen taiji boxing) – and I argue that understanding taijiquan in terms of embodied intentionality allows us to understand important taijiquan concepts such as chansijin, yin, and yang. Although in this article I focus on one specific style of martial art, I argue that the general analysis of the gong-fa distinction based on embodied intentionality is widely applicable.

View/Download

10.18573/j.2017.10098

Citation

Nulty, Timothy J. 2017. ‘Gong and Fa in Chinese Martial Arts’, Martial Arts Studies 3, 51-64.

Contributor

Timothy J. Nulty is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.

Book Review: Fighting Scholars

Fighting Scholars:
Habitus and Ethnographies of Martial Arts and Combat Sports.
by Raúl Sánchez García and Dale C. Spencer (editors)
Anthem Press, 2014
234 pages

View/Download

10.18573/j.2017.10101

Reviewer

Dr. Anu Vaittinen is a qualitative sociologist of sport, health and physical culture. She holds a position of a research associate for the Institute of Health & Society at Newcastle University (UK). Anu is a lifelong sports practitioner and is a recreational MMA and wing chun practitioner and a novice triathlete.

Synthesizing Zhenshi (Authenticity) and Shizhan (Combativity)

Abstract

This article argues that Donnie Yen’s Ip Man series (2008-2015) synthesizes two predominant unarmed, hand-to-hand combat traditions of Hong Kong martial arts cinema – what I call zhenshi (真實; authenticity) and shizhan (實戰; combativity), represented by the series of kung fu films featuring Kwan Tak-hing as the legendary Wong Fei-hung and the martial arts action films of Bruce Lee respectively. Despite kung fu cinema’s claim to ‘realism’ since its conception in the 1949, there is a strong suppression of wu (武; the martial) in the genre’s action aesthetics due to the elevation of wen (文; the literary and the artistic) in traditional Chinese culture. By exposing the inherent contradictions within kung fu cinema and incorporating of combative action aesthetics derived from Bruce Lee’s martial arts philosophy and wing chun principles – what I call kuai ( 快; speed), hen (狠; brutality), and zhun (準; precision), the series presents new possibilities of wu and offers a more comprehensive understanding of Chinese kung fu.

View/Download

10.18573/j.2017.10096

Citation

Wong, Wayne. 2017. ‘Synthesizing Zhenshi (Authenticity) and Shizhan (Combativity): Reinventing Chinese Kung Fu in Donnie Yen’s Ip Man Series (2008 – 2015)’, Martial Arts Studies 3, 6-23.

Contributor

Wayne K. T. Wong is a joint PhD student at the Department of Comparative Literature at The University of Hong Kong and the Film Studies Department at King’s College London. His research interests include martial arts cinema, action cinema, and digital culture. He is currently researching the transformation of kung fu cinema amid the hegemonic presence of Chinese cinema and Hollywood.

Book Review: The Fighting Art of Pencak Silat and Its Music

The Fighting Art of Pencak Silat and Its Music:
From Southeast Asian Village to Global Movement
by Uwe U. Paetzold and Paul H. Mason (editors)
Brill, 2016
376 pages

View/Download

10.18573/j.2017.10100

Reviewer

Colin P. McGuire is Irish Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Music, University College Cork, Ireland.

Applied Linguistics, Performance Theory and Muhammad Ali’s Japanese Failure

Abstract

One of the more colorful realizations of the age-old striking versus grappling rivalry came in 1976, in a fight billed as boxing versus professional wrestling. Unlike similar matches throughout history, however, this event featured the heavyweight world champion, Muhammad Ali, and the most popular Japanese professional wrestler of the day, Antonio Inoki. Investigating this event through the lens of applied linguistic anthropology reveals much about the contextual social dynamics at play. Sources including newspaper reports, interviews with witnesses and those involved, and private correspondence are considered as they unveil the complicated truth behind Ali vs. Inoki, the fight that marked a turning point in the career of history’s most celebrated boxing champion. Analysis reveals that the event was a public failure because of communication breakdown on myriad fronts. Consequently, I argue that the fight itself should be viewed as a robust form of communication in which the nuances of dialect are at play.

View/Download

10.18573/j.2017.10095

Citation

Miracle, Jared. 2017. ‘Applied Linguistics, Performance Theory and Muhammad Ali’s Japanese Failure’, Martial Arts Studies 3, 65-71.

Contributor

Jared Miracle is author of Now with Kung Fu Grip! How Bodybuilders, Soldiers and a Hairdresser Reinvented Martial Arts for America. His research interests include transnational physical culture, martial arts, popular culture, and folk studies. He is presently researching a book on the development of the Pokémon franchise.

Taolu

Abstract

The practice of taolu (tao4lu4, tào lù, 套路), the prearranged movement patterns of the Chinese martial arts, has been explained in fantastically diverse ways spanning a range of interpretations from the essential and functional to the narrative, theatrical and religious. Rather than trying to find a universal reason for the practice of taolu, this paper proposes to look at the idea of prearranged movement patterns through the lens of credibility and decipherability. These twin concepts, borrowed from the Great Reform movement in 20th century theatre practice, helpfully embrace both the criteria by which the performance of taolu is usually judged and also the deficiencies in our contemporary understanding of reasons behind this palimpsestic training method. As conceptual tools, credibility and decipherability also offer us insight into how the practice of prearranged martial movement patterns is presented and interpreted as a personal and phenomenological experience of embodied practice. This paper hopes to pragmatically present new perspectives from which the practice of taolu can be understood.

View/Download

10.18573/j.2017.10094

Citation

Mroz, Daniel. 2017. ‘Taolu: Credibility and Decipherability in the Practice of Chinese Martial Arts’, Martial Arts Studies 3, 38-50.

Contributor

Daniel Mroz is a theatre director, university professor and student of the martial arts. His recent performances have been presented at the Canada Dance Festival and the Évènement Zones Théâtrales. The Dancing Word, his book on how to use the Chinese martial arts in the practice of contemporary theatre, is published by Brills. He studies martial arts with Chen Zhonghua and studied acting and directing with Richard Fowler. He holds a Doctorat en études et pratiques des arts from the Université du Québec à Montréal. He is Associate Professor in the Department of Theatre at the University of Ottawa
where he teaches acting and directing.

Pink Gloves Still Give Black Eyes

 

Abstract

This article considers the gendered significance of women’s participation in combat sports, with a specific focus on the performances of femininity by female combat athletes. Against lines of argument which posit that women’s enactment of femininity is the result of restrictive, coercive, and ultimately conservative cultural pressures, respondents in two separate studies suggested that a purposeful, selective enactment of femininity, when understood in combination with their fighting ability, signified an important challenge to orthodox understandings of gender. As such, our data suggests that manoeuvring within normative cultural parameters of gender may, ironically, help to stimulate change in its structure of meanings, given that the feminine performances of these fighters ultimately posed symbolic challenges to cultural constructions of (‘normal’) women as inevitably weaker and inferior athletes compared to men. We therefore advocate that scholars with an interest in exploring the subversion of gender remain mindful of the possibility that such subversive impulses might occur via the appropriation, and re-signification, of some of its more orthodox norms.

View/Download

10.18573/j.2017.10093

Citation

Channon, Alex and Phipps, Catherine. 2017. ‘Pink Gloves Still Give Black Eyes’, Martial Arts Studies 3, 24-37.

Contributor

Alex Channon is Senior Lecturer in Physical Education and Sport Studies at the University of Brighton, UK. His research explores various aspects of the relationship between sport, gender and the body, with a particular focus on martial arts and combat sports. Alex is the co-editor of Global Perspectives on Women in Combat Sports [Palgrave Macmillan, 2015], and the co-founder of the anti-violence initiative, Love Fighting Hate Violence [www.lfhv.org].
Catherine Phipps is a PhD student at the University of Greenwich, UK. Her research explores LGBTQ+ inclusion in university-based sport, with her wider research interests including gender and combat sports. Catherine currently competes in boxing and muay thai.

Contact the journal

If you would like to get in touch with the editorial team, you can leave a message below or email using the link below: